Comix Films at Cinematheque

fritz_the_cat

Fritz the Cat

UW Cinematheque, in conjunction with the exhibition Underground Classics: The Transformation of Comics into Comix, 1963–1990, presents three films inspired by the underground comix movement, including a visit from author and filmmaker Patrick Rosenkranz.

Friday, May 1, 2009, 7:30 p.m.
Film: Fritz the Cat, 1972, directed by Ralph Bakshi
4070 Vilas Hall, 821 University Avenue. Doors open at 7 p.m.

  • Based on a character created by R. Crumb, Fritz the cat was an ever-changing character on paper.  On celluloid Fritz finds himself the subject of an X-rated satire of college life and social activism.  Crumb was reportedly horrified by the right-wing political bent of the film’s humor, but there is no doubt that Bakshi’s film was a stunning box-office success, grossing more than $100 million and bringing the comix aesthetic decidedly above-ground.

Saturday May 2, 2009, 7:30 p.m.
An Evening with Patrick Rosenkranz
4070 Vilas Hall, 821 University Avenue. Doors open at 7 p.m.

  • Best known for the books Rebel Visions and You Call this Art?, Patrick Rosenkranz is also an accomplished documentary filmmaker. On this night Rosenkranz will visit the Cinematheque to present a program of his own documentary short films.  The program’s highlight will be the premiere of the Rand Holmes Retrospective Art Show, a tribute to the comix artist shot at a retrospective on his native Lasqueti Island.
  • Underground Classics: The Transformation of Comics into Comix books will be available to buy

Friday May 8, 2009, 7:30 p.m.
Film:  Crumb, 1994, directed by Terry Zwigoff
4070 Vilas Hall, 821 University Avenue. Doors open at 7 p.m.

  • Zwigoff’s documentary is not so much about the artist Crumb as it is about the man. And his brothers.  A deeply personal exploration of the aftermath of the Crumb boys’ abusive childhood, Crumb is about mental illness, coping mechanisms, and yes, comix.  At times very funny and at others deeply sad, Crumb not only casts light on the inspiration and the motivation behind R. Crumb’s work, it also introduces audiences to the work of his brothers.
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